How Many SharePoint Pros do I Need?


What is the bare minimum staff that is needed to stand up and maintain a SharePoint instance? I know the answer to this question varies based on farm configuration, and what the organization intends to DO with SharePoint. Whether they want to use purely out of the box (does anyone really settle for that anymore?), or go heavy custom development with custom branding. But let’s assume that a company wants to implement SharePoint 2010 as chiefly an intranet collaboration platform for say 5000-10000 users. A 3-4 server farm with 5-10 site collections. They are pretty much ok with the look and feel, and will use the UI and SPD to perform any changes to it. No heaving branding needed, but maybe some color and font changes. What sort of staff is required to configure and run SharePoint given those circumstances?

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5 comments on “How Many SharePoint Pros do I Need?

  1. IMO it’s a question that hinges on who your site collection administrators are. One org (30,000+) I support uses SharePoint for BI, Collab, and Workflow with 2 FTE’s. They have an internal user group of 100+ and make rely on business lines to staff qualified site collection administrators. Another org (30,000+) uses SharePoint for Collab, Workflow, and Social but have BA’s on the “SharePoint Team” and they have around 10-12 people on the team. Check out: http://avisuj.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/staffing-sharepoint-and-training-your-staff/

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  2. Given your requirements, you need 1 dedicated person or 2 people who share roles (such as someone who is also a DBA or takes care of other apps). This assumes that you have a support system (tiered helpdesk) and training (for helpdesk and basic user questions). With proper training, your users will depend on you less and less to do things for them and will do it themselves.

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      • Yes, one person can take care of a SharePoint Farm that size. There are two key things that should happen to maintain control. First, as stated previously, make sure that there is a support staff to handle the immediate user problems (how do I do this, or the site doesn’t load). A helpdesk should be able to answer those questions and the SharePoint administrator might have to train them. The second key area would be to grow organically. Only promote basic collaboration, hold internal user groups, quick 2-minute how-to videos, etc. As the organization matures, promote or roll out additional features then.

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